Hot and hungry: Canada could be a food superpower

Forget the tar sands, says economist Jeff Rubin. Global warming means a longer growing season and new crops for Canada’s Praries. Plus, heat waves and water shortages are battering traditional food suppliers.

Rubin sees Canada’s future in two commodities the country can exploit as the planet warms: water and food. Exporting water is a touchy subject and the source of endless controversy, but Rubin says Canada can export a “value-added” form of water that’s far less touchy: Food, which, after all, requires water to grow…

“Maybe Harper is in denial about climate change, but [these companies are] in the Prairies explaining to farmers how to grow [US] corn,” Rubin says.

He says it won’t even take that much to become a food superpower — “climate change will do the heavily lifting.” He suggests Canada could go from being a top-ten global food producer to a top-three food producer in the coming years.

“Maybe Harper is in denial about climate change, but [these companies are] in the Prairies explaining to farmers how to grow corn,” Rubin says.

He says it won’t even take that much to become a food superpower — “climate change will do the heavily lifting.” He suggests Canada could go from being a top-ten global food producer to a top-three food producer in the coming years.

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